Becoming Sustainable, Sustainably

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I’ve been on a kick lately – all about sustainability. It’s just at the very forefront of my mind, and honestly, how could it not be? It seems everywhere you look, there’s a new, horrific story about how human consumption is damaging the earth. God gave us this earth to take care of, to nurture, to love, and our rampant consumerism is killing it.

Literally.

Now, I’m not going to sit here and pretend to be a composting, family-towel-using icon of sustainable living. I’m quite the opposite, actually. But lately, I have been looking for easy ways to reduce my own footprint. Ways to be sustainable… sustainably, if you will.

Note: The rest of this post contains affiliate links – if you click through any of the links in the post below & make a purchase, I may receive compensation, at no additional cost to you. Thank you!

Get a reusable shopping bag
This, to me, is literally one of the easiest things you can do. In some states, like California and, I believe, Hawaii, there are laws in place to encourage people to do this simply by charging for bags. (Personally, I think Arizona should get on board with it, but that’s a ramble for another day.)

Most grocery stores these days sell reusable bags right at the front, and for a fairly decent price. I mean, come on. You can pick up a tote at Trader Joe’s for 99 cents. Just skip the oh-so-tempting caramel sea salt chocolate bar that they lure you in with at the impulse grab stands one day and get a bag instead… and then go hit up the sample counter an extra time to reward yourself for doing so. I won’t tell. 😉

Reusable cups – and straws!
Again, another super easy switch to make, and one that I can vouch will save you money on your daily Starbucks, while also conveniently limiting your use of single-use plastic, which is one of the biggest waste issues we’re battling right now.

Starbucks, and many other coffee shops, offer a cup discount for a personal cup – which, of course, makes sense as it avoids them having to use their own inventory. But it’s also a really good incentive to use one, especially now that they sell such cheap reusable options… Starbucks has a $2 hot cup and a $3 reusable cold cup up for grabs. I may or may not have bought multiples of both, and now am fully stocked for all of my iced coffee needs.

While you’re at it, maybe consider getting reusable straws too! If you’re like me (and my best friend, and my aunt, and many other people I can think of), you love straws. It just makes drinks taste different… and better! But have you ever paused to think just how many single-use straws you go through in a week, or even in a day? If you switch to something like these stainless steel reusable straws, you’ll easily reduce your straw consumption… and, on the bright side, won’t have to worry about running out of straws at home ever again!

Meal prep
Okay, this one might seem like a fairly odd one, but I’ve been really focusing on reducing my food waste lately. I don’t compost — mainly because I don’t quite know how, and because it’s a very intimidating concept, if I’m being honest — so I’ve tried to reduce what food waste I do have left simply by, well, making sure I can eat it all. I already try not to buy packaged food when it’s not necessary for the sake of cutting down of packaging waste (like packaged fruit, etc.) and the packaged food we do buy (deli meat, etc.) I try to find either recyclable or reusable packaging. I’m not kidding when I say that 90% of our Tupperware is from the deli section. The other 10% is “borrowed” from my parents… 🙂

Anywhos.

I’ve learned that prepping meals so that there are guaranteed leftovers avoids putting me in the awkward spot where there’s not quite enough left to save, but also way too much left to eat. (Although, again, being with a human garbage disposal does come in handy here, as he’ll usually eat clean up for the table if necessary.) Portioning out when cooking so that there’s a promised second meal helps me significantly reduce any unnecessary food waste from my cooked meal. It’s also made me more conscious of preserving what I can while actually cooking the meal, so I’d consider that a win-win.

(Plus, how adult do you feel when you’re bringing actual food to work instead of a PB&J? So adult.)

Search secondhand 
Garment manufacturing is a big issue when it comes to sustainability. I’ve always been a fan of making clothes and things last as long as possible. Shopping secondhand comes naturally to me (well, as naturally as any shopping might come. I’m not a huge browser and I love the sale rack, so shopping for clothes generally isn’t something I’d consider “natural.” But I digress.)

Plus, searching for finds secondhand offers the benefit to your wallet, too. I recently fell in love with ThredUp, which you can read all about in my awkward review. It was an easy and affordable way to refresh my summer wardrobe (I got my new favorite blouse out of it), and I felt better about my conscious purchasing.

Now, I realize this is only the tip of the iceberg… and that that might not be the best metaphor to use in this scenario, but I’ll assume that you catch my drift. But I don’t think that sustainability needs to be this huge, terrifying, intimidating concept that seems unreasonably difficult to implement into your daily life. Even the smallest things can make a difference.

So… what about you? Do you take any conscious steps towards keeping your own carbon footprint as small as realistically possible?

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